Make one small change to your furniture – for a massive change in productivity!

Watch our video for a quick introduction to the great benefits of sit-stand desks…

There are a wide variety of reasons why height adjustable desks can be a fantastic furniture solution for your business. There are potential health and comfort benefits for all of your workforce, particularly those with disabilities and back problems. If you are interested in hoteling or hot-desking, which is the practise of providing office space to employees on an as-needed basis, then height adjustable desks can be a great solution to fit a variety of heights and body types.

Researchers from a range of notable institutions have looked into the benefits of being able to both sit and stand throughout the working day. Findings include:

  • Significant decreases in the severity of musculoskeletal discomfort for most upper body regions.

  • Significantly less spinal shrinkage for office workers who stand for portions of the day

  • Body part discomfort decreasing an average of 62 percent, and the occurrence of injuries and illnesses decreasing by more than half

  • Workers taking shorter and fewer breaks when using sit to stand desks.

  • The enzymes that are responsible for burning fat appear to ‘shut down’ when we sit. Standing up while working therefore helps to reduce weight. 

So what does this mean for your office?

The outcomes of this research suggest that alternating between sitting and standing posture at work benefits health and productivity. So why not try these innovative desks in your organisation?

Contact us today to find out more about the range of height adjustable desks we offer.

Why not visit us to try a desk out for yourself?

Call our team today on 01268 524 624, or email sales@officeneedsgroup.co.uk

Sources: http://ergo.human.cornell.edu/pub/hflabreports/eharep0904.pdf
http://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2012/11_0323.htm?s_cid=pcd9e154_x
http://www.medibank.com.au/Client/Documents/Pdfs/Stand_Up_Australia.pdf
http://munews.missouri.edu/news-releases/2007/1115-hamilton-inactivity.php